Volume 25 - Article 26 | Pages 819-836

China’s far below replacement fertility and its long-term impact: Comments on the preliminary results of the 2010 census

By Zhongwei Zhao, Wei Chen

Print this page  Send this article to a friend  Twitter

 

 
Date received:30 Sep 2011
Date published:09 Dec 2011
Word count:5100
Keywords:Census results, China, fertility level, UN 2010 Population Projection
DOI:10.4054/DemRes.2011.25.26
 

Abstract

The Chinese government conducted its sixth national census in 2010 and released its major results in April 2011. According to the National Bureau of Statistics the quality of the census was very high. Although the currently released census results consist of limited statistics only, they shed new light on China’s recent fertility levels, which have been debated among scholars and policy makers for more than a decade. The 2010 census results, however, also show considerable inconsistencies with those published by the United Nations Population Division recently. This paper will, on the basis of newly published census results and other available evidence, further examine China’s recent fertility decline and its impact on the country’s long-term development. It will also comment on the major discrepancies between the results of Chinese government recent population projection, the United Nations’ World Population Prospects, the 2010 Revision and China’s 2010 census, and investigate the underlying causes that have led to these differences.

Author's Affiliation

Zhongwei Zhao - Australian National University, Australia [Email]
Wei Chen - People´s University of China, China [Email]

Other articles by the same author/authors in Demographic Research

» Could changes in reported sex ratios at birth during China's 1958-1961 famine support the adaptive sex ratio adjustment hypothesis?
Volume 29 - Article 33

Most recent similar articles in Demographic Research

» The gender divide in urban China: Singlehood and assortative mating by age and education
Volume 31 - Article 45    | Keywords: China

» Could changes in reported sex ratios at birth during China's 1958-1961 famine support the adaptive sex ratio adjustment hypothesis?
Volume 29 - Article 33    | Keywords: China

» Does migration benefit the schooling of children left behind?: Evidence from rural northwest China
Volume 29 - Article 2    | Keywords: China

» Very long range global population scenarios to 2300 and the implications of sustained low fertility
Volume 28 - Article 39    | Keywords: China

» The association between resilience and survival among Chinese elderly
Volume 23 - Article 5    | Keywords: China

Articles

»Volume 25

 

Citations

 

 

Similar Articles

 

 

Jump to Article

Volume Page
Volume Article ID