Volume 13 - Article 22 | Pages 559-572

Why does Sweden have such high fertility?

By Jan M. Hoem

Print this page  Send this article to a friend  Twitter

 

 
Date received:18 Aug 2005
Date published:24 Nov 2005
Word count:3151
Keywords:fertility trends, Germany, impacts of family policies, institutional effects, Sweden
DOI:10.4054/DemRes.2005.13.22
Updated Items:Minor corrections to Table 2 (German battery information) were made on March 10, 2006.
 

Abstract

By current European standards, Sweden has had a relatively high fertility in recent decades. During the 1980s and 1990s, the annual Total Fertility Rate (TFR) for Sweden undu­lated consid­erably around a level just under 1.8, which is a bit lower than the corresponding level in France and well above the level in West Germany. (In 2004 the Swedish TFR reached 1.76 on an upward trend.) The Swedish com­pleted Cohort Fertility Rate (CFR) was rather constant at 2 for the cohorts that produced children in the same period; for France it stayed around 2.1 while the West-German CFR was lower and de­clined regularly to around 1.6. In this presentation, I describe the back­ground for these develop­ments and explain the unique Swedish undulations.

Author's Affiliation

Jan M. Hoem - Stockholm University, Sweden [Email]

Other articles by the same author/authors in Demographic Research

» Immigrant fertility in Sweden, 2000-2011: A descriptive note
Volume 30 - Article 30

» Recent fertility patterns of Finnish women by union status: A descriptive account
Volume 28 - Article 14

» Levels of recent union formation : Six European countries compared
Volume 22 - Article 9

» The negative educational gradients in Romanian fertility
Volume 22 - Article 4

» Overview Chapter 8: The impact of public policies on European fertility
Volume 19 - Article 10

» Summary and general conclusions: Childbearing Trends and Policies in Europe
Volume 19 - Article 2

» Preface: Childbearing Trends and Policies in Europe
Volume 19 - Article 1

» Marriage formation as a process intermediary between migration and childbearing
Volume 18 - Article 21

» The reporting of statistical significance in scientific journals: A reflexion
Volume 18 - Article 15

» Generations and Gender Survey (GGS): Towards a Better Understanding of Relationships and Processes in the Life Course
Volume 17 - Article 14

» Anticipatory analysis and its alternatives in life-course research: Part 2: Marriage and first birth
Volume 15 - Article 17

» Anticipatory analysis and its alternatives in life-course research: Part 1: Education and first childbearing
Volume 15 - Article 16

» Educational attainment and ultimate fertility among Swedish women born in 1955-59
Volume 14 - Article 16

» Education and childlessness: The relationship between educational field, educational level, and childlessness among Swedish women born in 1955-59
Volume 14 - Article 15

» Social differentials in speed-premium effects in childbearing in Sweden
Volume 14 - Article 4

» Childbearing patterns for Swedish mothers of twins, 1961-1999
Volume 11 - Article 15

Most recent similar articles in Demographic Research

» Social differentials in speed-premium effects in childbearing in Sweden
Volume 14 - Article 4    | Keywords: fertility trends, impacts of family policies, institutional effects, Sweden

» Demographic trends in Sweden: An update of childbearing and nuptiality up to 2002
Volume 11 - Article 4    | Keywords: fertility trends, Sweden

» Local determinants of crime: Do military bases matter?
Volume 31 - Article 21    | Keywords: Germany

» Fertility and the fast-track: Continued childbearing among professionals in Sweden, 1991-2009
Volume 31 - Article 15    | Keywords: Sweden

» Digit preferences in marriage formation in Sweden: Millennium marriages and birthday peaks
Volume 30 - Article 25    | Keywords: Sweden

Articles

»Volume 13

 

Citations

 

Similar Articles

 

 

Jump to Article

Volume Page
Volume Article ID