Volume 14 - Article 4 | Pages 51-70

Social differentials in speed-premium effects in childbearing in Sweden

By Gunnar Andersson, Jan M. Hoem, Ann-Zofie Duvander

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Date received:29 Sep 2005
Date published:27 Jan 2006
Word count:3977
Keywords:fertility, fertility determinants, fertility trends, impacts of family policies, institutional effects, Sweden
DOI:10.4054/DemRes.2006.14.4
 

Abstract

In Sweden, parents receive a parental-leave allowance of a high percentage (currently 80%) of their pre-birth salary for about a year in connection with any birth. If they space their births sufficiently closely, they avoid a reduction in the allowance caused by any reduced income earned between the births. The gain is popularly called a “speed premium”. In previous work we have shown that childbearing was sped up correspondingly. This is clear evidence of a causal effect of a policy change on childbearing behavior. In the present paper, we study how this change in behavior was adopted in various social strata of the Swedish population.

Author's Affiliation

Gunnar Andersson - Stockholm University, Sweden [Email]
Jan M. Hoem - Stockholm University, Sweden [Email]
Ann-Zofie Duvander - Statistics Sweden, Sweden [Email]

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