Volume 15 - Article 19 | Pages 517-536

Progression to third birth in Morocco in the context of fertility transition

By Agata V. D’Addato

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Date received:11 Apr 2006
Date published:08 Dec 2006
Word count:5465
Keywords:event history analysis, fertility transition, Morocco, progression from second to third birth
DOI:10.4054/DemRes.2006.15.19
 

Abstract

Progression from second to third birth is a critical reproductive decision in contemporary Morocco. The study thus aims at analyzing the main determinants of third-birth intensities, applying an event-history analysis to the most recent Moroccan survey data. Differences among social groups still persist in the country. Nevertheless, in the background of current modernization and geared to promote women’s status, all segments of the population are rapidly changing their fertility behavior. This applies even to the most laggard group, such as illiterate women. The analysis also shows no significant or clear evidence of sex preference among Moroccan mothers in the progression to the third child.

Author's Affiliation

Agata V. D’Addato - Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), France [Email]

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