Volume 27 - Article 25 | Pages 719-742

Labor-market status, migrant status and first childbearing in Sweden

By Karin E. Lundström, Gunnar Andersson

Print this page  Send this article to a friend  Twitter

 

 
Date received:09 Aug 2011
Date published:11 Dec 2012
Word count:4256
Keywords:fertility, labor market, migration, status, Sweden, uncertainty
DOI:10.4054/DemRes.2012.27.25
Weblink:You will find all publications in this Special Collection “Economic uncertainty and family dynamics in Europe” at http://www.demographic-research.org/special/12/
 

Abstract

Background: Labor market uncertainties and employment insecurity have emerged as increasingly important factors in research on family formation and fertility.

Objective: In the present study, we provide evidence from Sweden on how non-employment, unemployment, and temporary employment relate to young people’s first birth risks.

Methods: We use a combination of Labor Force Survey data on employment characteristics and register data on demographic outcomes to investigate how the labor market status and stability of employment are associated with the first birth behavior of women and men, and of Swedish- and foreign-born people in Sweden.

Results: Consistent with previous research, we find that people who are not in the labor force are less likely than those who are employed to enter parenthood. In most cases, we also find that young people who are in temporary employment are less likely than those who are permanently employed to start a family.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that foreign-born people living in Sweden tend to adapt to the behavior of native-born Swedes, and that patterns for women and men are largely similar. We relate these findings to the equalizing impact of the country’s universal welfare regime.

Author's Affiliation

Karin E. Lundström - Statistics Sweden, Sweden [Email]
Gunnar Andersson - Stockholm University, Sweden [Email]

Other articles by the same author/authors in Demographic Research

» Economic Uncertainty and Family Dynamics in Europe: Introduction
Volume 27 - Article 28

» High Suburban Fertility: Evidence from Four Northern European Countries
Volume 21 - Article 31

» Cohort Fertility Patterns in the Nordic Countries
Volume 20 - Article 14

» Childbearing dynamics of couples in a universalistic welfare state: The role of labor-market status, country of origin, and gender
Volume 17 - Article 30

» Migration and first-time parenthood: Evidence from Kyrgyzstan
Volume 17 - Article 25

» Understanding parental gender preferences in advanced societies: Lessons from Sweden and Finland
Volume 17 - Article 6

» Educational attainment and ultimate fertility among Swedish women born in 1955-59
Volume 14 - Article 16

» Education and childlessness: The relationship between educational field, educational level, and childlessness among Swedish women born in 1955-59
Volume 14 - Article 15

» Social differentials in speed-premium effects in childbearing in Sweden
Volume 14 - Article 4

» Demographic trends in Sweden: An update of childbearing and nuptiality up to 2002
Volume 11 - Article 4

» A summary of Special Collection 3: Contemporary Research on European Fertility: Perspectives and Developments
Volume 10 - Article 13

» Children's experience of family disruption and family formation: Evidence from 16 FFS countries
Volume 7 - Article 7

» Life-table representations of family dynamics in Sweden, Hungary, and 14 other FFS countries: A project of descriptions of demographic behavior
Volume 7 - Article 4

» Fertility developments in Norway and Sweden since the early 1960s
Volume 6 - Article 4

» Demographic trends in Sweden: Childbearing developments in 1961-2000, marriage and divorce developments in 1971-1999
Volume 5 - Article 3

» Contemporary Research on European Fertility: Introduction
Special Collection 3 - Article 1

» Childbearing Developments in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden from the 1970s to the 1990s: A Comparison
Special Collection 3 - Article 7

Most recent similar articles in Demographic Research

» Should governments in Europe be more aggressive in pushing for gender equality to raise fertility? The second "NO"
Volume 24 - Article 10    | Keywords: fertility, labor market, migration

» Fertility and the fast-track: Continued childbearing among professionals in Sweden, 1991-2009
Volume 31 - Article 15    | Keywords: fertility, Sweden

» Domestic gender equality and childbearing in Sweden
Volume 29 - Article 40    | Keywords: fertility, Sweden

» Fertility Reactions to the "Great Recession" in Europe: Recent Evidence from Order-Specific Data
Volume 29 - Article 4    | Keywords: fertility, uncertainty

» Economic Uncertainty and Family Dynamics in Europe: Introduction
Volume 27 - Article 28    | Keywords: fertility, uncertainty