Volume 31 - Article 6 | Pages 137-160

Male fertility in Greece: Trends and differentials by education level and employment status

By Alexandra Tragaki, Christos Bagavos

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Date received:01 Nov 2013
Date published:09 Jul 2014
Word count:4886
Keywords:decomposition, education, employment status, Greece, male fertility
DOI:10.4054/DemRes.2014.31.6
 

Abstract

Background: More than downplayed, the role of men in the demographic analysis of reproduction has been entirely neglected. However, male fertility can be an important issue for exploring how economic and employment uncertainties relate to fertility and family dynamics.

Objective: This paper intends to study fertility variations over time, relying solely on data referring to father’s socio-demographic characteristics; in particular, their age, education level, and employment status.

Methods: We use a combination of Labor Force Survey and Demographic Statistics data on population and Vital Statistics on births to estimate male fertility indicators and fertility differentials by education level and employment status, for the period 1992-2011 in Greece. In addition, over-time developments in male TFR are separated into structural (education-specific and employment-specific distributions) and behavioral (fertility, per se) changes.

Results: We find that the male fertility level is declining, the fertility pattern is moving into higher ages, and the reproduction period for men is getting shorter. From 1992 up to 2008, changes in male fertility were mostly driven by behavioral rather than compositional factors. However, the decline of male fertility over the period of economic recession (2008-2011) is largely attributed to the continuous decrease in the proportions of employed men.

Conclusions: The study suggests that male fertility merits further exploration. In particular, years of economic downturn and countries where household living standards are mostly associated with male employment, a father’s employability is likely to emerge as an increasingly important factor of fertility outcomes.

Author's Affiliation

Alexandra Tragaki - Harokopio University of Athens, Greece [Email]
Christos Bagavos - Panteion University of Athens, Greece [Email]

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