Volume 20 - Article 14 | Pages 313–352  

Cohort fertility patterns in the Nordic countries

By Gunnar Andersson, Marit Rønsen, Lisbeth B. Knudsen, Trude Lappegård, Gerda Neyer, Kari Skrede, Kathrin Teschner, Andres Vikat

References

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Billari, F. C., Kohler, H.-P., Andersson, G., Lundström, H. (2007). Approaching the limit: Long-term trends in late and very late fertility. Population and Development Review 33(1): 149-170.

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Björklund, A. (2006). Does family policy affect fertility? Lessons from Sweden. Journal of Population Economics 19(1): 3-24.

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Hoem, B. (2000). Entry into motherhood in Sweden: The influence of economic factors on the rise and fall in fertility, 1986-1997. Demographic Research 2(4).

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Hoem, J. M. and Kreyenfeld, M. (2006b). Anticipatory analysis and its alternatives in life-course research. Part 2: Two interacting processes. Demographic Research 15(17): 485-498.

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Hoem, J. M. and Kreyenfeld, M. (2006a). Anticipatory analysis and its alternatives in life-course research: Part 1: The role of education in the study of first childbearing. Demographic Research 15(16): 461-484.

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Hoem, J. M., Neyer, G., and Andersson, G. (2006a). Education and childlessness: The relationship between educational field, educational level, and childlessness among Swedish women born in 1955-59. Demographic Research 14(15): 331-380.

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Hoem, J. M., Neyer, G., and Andersson, G. (2006b). Educational attainment and ultimate fertility among Swedish women born in 1955-59. Demographic Research 14(16): 381-404.

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Lappegård, T. and Rønsen, M. (2005). The multifaceted impact of education on entry into motherhood. European Journal of Population/Revue européenne de Démographie 21(1): 31-49.

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