Volume 23 - Article 14 | Pages 399–420  

A modified new method for estimating smoking-attributable mortality in high-income countries

By Brian L. Rostron

Abstract

Preston, Glei, and Wilmoth (2010) recently proposed an innovative regression-based method to estimate smoking-attributable mortality in developed countries based on observed lung cancer death rates. Their estimates for females, however, differ appreciably from some published estimates. This article presents a modified version of the Preston, Glei, and Wilmoth method that includes an age-period interaction term in its model. This modified version produces improved estimates of smoking-attributable mortality that are consistent with results from a modified version of the Peto-Lopez indirect method.

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Other articles by the same author/authors in Demographic Research

The contribution of smoking-attributable mortality to differences in mortality and life expectancy among US African-American and white adults, 2000–2019
Volume 46 - Article 31

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