Volume 46 - Article 7 | Pages 179–216  

On the contribution of foreign-born populations to overall population change in Europe: Methodological insights and contemporary evidence for 31 European countries

By Christos Bagavos

References

Abel, G.J. and Sander, N. (2014). Quantifying global international migration flows. Science 343(6178): 1520–1522.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Aldridge, R.W., Nellums, B.L., and Bartlett, S. (2018). Global patterns of mortality in international migrants: A systematic review. The Lancet 392: 2553–2566.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Alho, J.M. (2008). Migration, fertility, and aging in stable populations. Demography 45(3): 641–650.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Bagavos, C. (2019). On the multifaceted impact of migration on the fertility of receiving countries: methodological insights and contemporary evidence for Europe, the United States and Australia. Demographic Research 41(1): 1–36.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Burkimsher, M., Rossier, C., and Wanner, P. (2018). Who has more children in Switzerland: Swiss or foreign women? Why the TFR is a misleading measure. Geneva: University of Geneva.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Canudas Romo, V. (2003). Decomposition methods in demography. Groningen: Rijksuniversiteit Groningen.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Coleman, D. (2008). The demographic effects of international migration in Europe. Oxford Review of Economic Policy 24(3): 452–476.

Weblink:
Download reference:

de Beer, J., Raymer, J., van der Erf, R., and van Wissen, L. (2010). Overcoming the problems of inconsistent international migration data: A new method applied to flows in Europe. European Journal of Population 26(4): 459–481.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Ediev, D., Coleman, D., and Scherbov, S. (2013). New measures of population reproduction for an era of high migration. Population Space and Place 20(7): 622–645.

Weblink:
Download reference:

European Commission (2020). Report from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on the Impact of Demographic Change.

Eurostat (2020). Deaths by age, sex and country of birth [demo_macbc].

Download reference:

Eurostat (2020). Emigration by age group, sex and country of birth [migr_emi4ctb].

Download reference:

Eurostat (2017). Expert group on refugee and internally displaced persons statistics, international recommendations on refugee statistics.

Download reference:

Eurostat (2020). Immigration by age group, sex and country of birth [migr_imm3ctb].

Download reference:

Eurostat (2020). Live births by mother’s age and country of birth [demo_facbc].

Download reference:

Eurostat (2021). Population (demo_pop) Metadata.

Download reference:

Eurostat (2020). Population change - Demographic balance and crude rates at national level [demo_gind].

Download reference:

Eurostat (2020). Population on 1 January by age group, sex and country of birth [migr_pop3ctb].

Download reference:

Giannantoni, P. and Strozza, S. (2015). Foreigners’ contribution to the evolution of fertility in Italy: A re-examination of the decade 2001–2011. Rivista Italiana di Economia Demografia e Statistica 69(2): 129–140.

Download reference:

INSEE (2021). Naissances selon le pays de naissance des parents [electronic resource].

Weblink:
Download reference:

Kitagawa, E.M. (1955). Components of a difference between two rates. Journal of the American Statistical Association 50(272): 1168–1194.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Lübke, C. (2015). How migration affects the timing of childbearing: The transition to a first birth among Polish women in Britain. European Journal of Population 31(1): 1–20.

Weblink:
Download reference:

MacKellar, L.F. and McNicoll, G. (2019). International migration: Approaches, issues, policies. Introduction to the online collection of articles. Population and Development Review 45(4): e12246.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Murphy, M. (2016). The impact of migration on long-term European population trends, 1950 to present. Population and Development Review 42(2): 225–244.

Weblink:
Download reference:

ONS (2021). Live births by country of birth of mother and of father [electronic resource].

Poulain, M., Perrin, N., and Singleton, A. (eds.) (2006). Towards harmonised European statistics on European migration (THESIM). Louvain la Neuve: Presses Universitaires de Louvain.

Download reference:

Poveda, A.R. and Ortega, J.A. (2010). The impact of migration on birth replacement: The Spanish case. In: Salzmann, T., Edmonston, B., and Raymer, J. (eds.). Demographic aspects of migration. Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften: 97–121.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Raymer, J. and Willekens, F. (eds.) (2008). International migration in Europe. Data, models and estimates. Chichester: John Wiley.

Download reference:

Rendall, M.S. and Salt, J. (2005). The foreign-born population. In: Chappell, R. (ed.). Focus on people and migration. London: Palgrave Macmillan: 131–152.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Robards, J. and Berrington, A. (2016). The fertility of recent migrants to England and Wales. Demographic Research 34(36): 1037–1052.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Sevak, P. and Schmidt, L. (2008). Immigrant-native fertility and mortality differentials in the United States. Michigan Retirement Research Center Research Paper WP 2008-181.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Sobotka, T. (2008). Overview Chapter 7: The rising importance of migrants for childbearing in Europe. Demographic Research 19(9): 225–248.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Tønnessen, M. (2020). Declined total fertility rate among immigrants and the role of newly arrived women in Norway. European Journal of Population 36: 547–573.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Toulemon, L. (2004). Fertility among immigrant women: New data, a new approach. Population and Societies 400.

Toulemon, L. and Mazuy, M. (2004). Comment prendre en compte l’âge à l’arrivée et la durée de séjour en France dans la mesure de la fécondité des immigrants? Paris: INED, Collection: Documents de travail 120.

US Census Bureau (2014). Methodology, assumptions, and inputs for the 2014 national projections. Washington, D.C: US Census Bureau.

van Nimwegen, N. and van der Erf, R. (2010). Europe at the crossroads: Demographic challenges and international migration. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 36(9): 1359–1379.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Voets, S., Schoorl, J.J., and de Bruijn, B. (eds.) (1995). The demographic consequences of international migration. The Hague: Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute.

Download reference:

Wilson, B. (2020). Understanding how immigrant fertility differentials vary over the reproductive life course. European Journal of Population 36: 465–498.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Wilson, C., Sobotka, T., Williamson, L., and Boyle, P. (2013). Migration and intergenerational replacement in Europe. Population and Development Review 39(1): 131–157.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Wiśniowski, A. (2017). Combining Labour Force Survey data to estimate migration flows: The case of migration from Poland to the UK. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A 180(1): 185–202.

Weblink:
Download reference:

Back to the article

Volume
Page
Volume
Article ID