Volume 38 - Article 38 | Pages 1111–1154

The formation of ethnically mixed partnerships in Estonia: A stalling trend from a two-sided perspective

By Allan Puur, Leen Rahnu, Luule Sakkeus, Martin Klesment, Liili Abuladze

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Date received:07 Sep 2016
Date published:22 Mar 2018
Word count:10145
Keywords:Estonia, event history analysis, Generations and Gender Programme (GGP), immigrants, integration, partnership formation, second generation
DOI:10.4054/DemRes.2018.38.38
 

Abstract

Background: Ethnically mixed partnerships are often regarded as the ultimate evidence of the integration of migrants and their descendants into their host society. A common finding in the literature is an increase in the occurrence of mixed partnerships across migrant generations.

Objective: This study investigates the formation of minority–majority partnerships in Estonia, with special attention to the variation associated with the migrants’ generation and their exposure to the majority population.

Methods: The study uses pooled data from the Estonian Family and Fertility Survey (FFS) and the Estonian Generations and Gender Survey (GGS), and estimates proportional hazards models.

Results: The experience of second-generation migrants indicates a stalling trend in the incidence of mixed partnerships between the majority population and migrant groups, which is rooted in contextual features. Apart from residential proximity, the study shows the salience of early acquisition of the host society language. Our results for the majority population highlight the role of international migration, which exposes host populations to mixed partnership formation.

Conclusions: The results lend support to the view that the integration of migrant populations through mixed partnering is a lengthy process that stretches across several generations. A linguistically divided school system and residential segregation contribute to the pillarization of society.

Contribution: By focussing on an Eastern European context, the study contributes to a more comprehensive account of mixed unions in different socioeconomic and cultural settings. Estonia provides an interesting case as its migrant-origin minorities span several generations. The study underscores the importance of contextual factors for both the minority and majority populations.

Author's Affiliation

Allan Puur - Tallinna Ülikool, Estonia [Email]
Leen Rahnu - Tallinna Ülikool, Estonia [Email]
Luule Sakkeus - Tallinna Ülikool, Estonia [Email]
Martin Klesment - Tallinna Ülikool, Estonia [Email]
Liili Abuladze - Tallinna Ülikool, Estonia [Email]

Other articles by the same author/authors in Demographic Research

» Childbearing among first- and second-generation Russians in Estonia against the background of the sending and host countries
Volume 36 - Article 41

» Socioeconomic and cultural differentials in mortality in a late 19th century urban setting: A linked records study from Tartu, Estonia, 1897-1900
Volume 36 - Article 1

» Partnership dynamics among migrants and their descendants in Estonia
Volume 32 - Article 56

» Varying association between education and second births in Europe: Comparative analysis based on the EU-SILC data
Volume 31 - Article 27

» Jobs, careers, and becoming a parent under state socialist and market conditions: Evidence from Estonia 1971-2006
Volume 30 - Article 64

» Intergenerational family constellations in contemporary Europe: Evidence from the Generations and Gender Survey
Volume 25 - Article 4

» Effects of education on second births before and after societal transition: Evidence from the Estonian GGS
Volume 22 - Article 28

» Reconciling studies of men’s gender attitudes and fertility: Response to Westoff and Higgins
Volume 22 - Article 8

» Men's childbearing desires and views of the male role in Europe at the dawn of the 21st century
Volume 19 - Article 56

» First union formation in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania: patterns across countries and gender
Volume 17 - Article 10

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