Volume 42 - Article 24 | Pages 713–726  

Lexis fields

By Tim Riffe, Jose Manuel Aburto

This article is part of the Special Collection 29 "Data Visualization"

Abstract

Background: Lexis surfaces are visualizations designed to show how a given value changes over age and time. Vector fields are two-dimensional representations of two variables: usually direction and speed (or force).

Objective: We aim to increase the dimensionality of patterns shown on the Lexis surface by placing a vector field on the Lexis surface.

Results: We show Lexis fields of the relationship between life expectancy and the standard deviation of remaining lifespan over age and time. These instruments enable information layering on standard Lexis surfaces that is not common practice.

Contribution: Lexis fields extend the descriptive and analytic power of the Lexis surface, and these can be designed to display information at higher densities than standard Lexis surfaces.

Author's Affiliation

Other articles by the same author/authors in Demographic Research

Bayesian implementation of Rogers–Castro model migration schedules: An alternative technique for parameter estimation
Volume 49 - Article 42

Dynamics of the coefficient of variation of the age at death distribution
Volume 49 - Article 38

Leveraging deep neural networks to estimate age-specific mortality from life expectancy at birth
Volume 47 - Article 8

Divergent trends in lifespan variation during mortality crises
Volume 46 - Article 11

Editorial to the Special Issue on Demographic Data Visualization: Getting the point across – Reaching the potential of demographic data visualization
Volume 44 - Article 36

Mexican mortality 1990‒2016: Comparison of unadjusted and adjusted estimates
Volume 44 - Article 30

Exploring the demographic history of populations with enhanced Lexis surfaces
Volume 42 - Article 6

Geofaceting: Aligning small-multiples for regions in a spatially meaningful way
Volume 41 - Article 17

The threshold age of the lifetable entropy
Volume 41 - Article 4

Symmetries between life lived and left in finite stationary populations
Volume 35 - Article 14

The force of mortality by life lived is the force of increment by life left in stationary populations
Volume 32 - Article 29

Most recent similar articles in Demographic Research

Cohort fertility of immigrants to Israel from the former Soviet Union
Volume 50 - Article 13    | Keywords: age at first birth, assimilation, cohort analysis, fertility, immigration, parity, religiosity

Measuring short-term mobility patterns in North America using Facebook advertising data, with an application to adjusting COVID-19 mortality rates
Volume 50 - Article 10    | Keywords: COVID-19, data collection, Facebook, mortality, North America, short-term mobility

Fertility decline, changes in age structure, and the potential for demographic dividends: A global analysis
Volume 50 - Article 9    | Keywords: age structure, demographic dividend, demographic transition, fertility, migration, population momentum, working-age population

Immigrant mortality advantage in the United States during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic
Volume 50 - Article 7    | Keywords: COVID-19, immigrants, mortality

Analyzing hyperstable population models
Volume 49 - Article 37    | Keywords: birth trajectory, cohort analysis, cyclical populations, dynamic population model, fertility, hyperstable, period