Volume 35 - Article 23 | Pages 645–670

Coresidence with elderly parents and female labor supply in China

By Ke Shen, Ping Yan, Yi Zeng

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Date received:01 Apr 2014
Date published:06 Sep 2016
Word count:8289
Keywords:intergenerational coresidence, labor supply, living arrangements
DOI:10.4054/DemRes.2016.35.23
Weblink:You will find all publications in this Special Collection on “Interdisciplinary Research on Healthy Aging” here.
 

Abstract

Background: The female labor force participation rate in China has experienced a significant decline over the past two decades. Existing studies attribute this decline to the retreat of government protection of female employment and growing gender discrimination in the labor market, while overlooking other factors such as changing living arrangements.

Objective: This paper aims to explore the causal effect of coresidence or nearby residence with parents on female labor supply in China.

Methods: Based on a paired sample of middle-aged married women and their elderly parents, we apply the instrumental variable approach to correct for the endogeneity of living arrangement.

Results: We show that women coresiding with their parents are 27.9 percentage points more likely to work than those living apart, and women living with their parents in the same neighborhood are 34.9 percentage points more likely to work than those living in a different neighborhood. Also, on average, coresidence or nearby residence with parents significantly increases women’s work time by 20–26 hours per week. The positive impacts of this living arrangement are more prominent in urban areas than in rural areas. We also show that intergenerational coresidence allows women to share the burden of housework with their parents, thus leading to increased labor supply.

Conclusions: Our study offers a fresh explanation for the drop in female labor force participation in China since 1990. Policies directed towards encouraging intergenerational coresidence would be effective in improving female labor supply.

Contribution: This paper brings new evidence on the causal relationship between living arrangement and female labor supply in China.

Author's Affiliation

Ke Shen - Fudan University, China [Email]
Ping Yan - Peking University, China [Email]
Yi Zeng - Duke University, United States of America [Email]

Other articles by the same author/authors in Demographic Research

» Preface to the Special Collection on Interdisciplinary Research on Healthy Aging
Volume 38 - Article 9

» The association between resilience and survival among Chinese elderly
Volume 23 - Article 5

» Estimating time-varying sex-age-specific o/e rates of marital status transitions in family household projection or simulation
Volume 11 - Article 10

» Sociodemographic Effects on the Onset and Recovery of ADL Disability among Chinese Oldest-old
Volume 11 - Article 1

» Oldest Old Mortality in China
Volume 8 - Article 7

» Association of Divorce with Socio-Demographic Covariates in China, 1955-1985: Event History Analysis Based on Data Collected in Shanghai, Hebei, and Shaanxi
Volume 7 - Article 11

» Family Dynamics of 63 Million (in 1990) to More Than 330 Million (in 2050) Elders in China
Volume 2 - Article 5

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