Volume 23 - Article 23 | Pages 655–668  

Senescence vs. sustenance: Evolutionary-demographic models of aging

By Annette Baudisch, James W. Vaupel

Abstract

Humans, and many other species, suffer senescence: mortality increases and fertility declines with adult age. Some species, however, enjoy sustenance: mortality and fertility remain constant. Here we develop simple but general evolutionary-demographic models to explain the conditions that favor senescence vs. sustenance. The models illustrate how mathematical demography can deepen understanding of the evolution of aging.

Author's Affiliation

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